Liberty: Child Refugees

libertyIn May our MPs made a promise. Under huge public pressure, and the watchful eye of the House of Lords, the Government pledged in Parliament to protect unaccompanied refugee children in Europe.

That was 105 days ago and counting.
Since then almost no action has been taken to make good on this pledge. Lord Dubs himself – who was instrumental in securing it – has condemned the astonishing lack of urgency from central Government. Continue reading “Liberty: Child Refugees”

Unlocking Detention 2016: be part of shining a spotlight in the shadows

RtREvery year for the past three years, Right to Remain has helped to run an innovative and participatory social media project that raises awareness of immigration detention in the UK – it’s called Unlocking Detention (http://unlocked.org.uk/) (or “Unlocked” for short).

Unlocking Detention is a ‘virtual tour’ of the UK’s immigration detention estate – and of the impact of detention on communities across the UK.  Each week, we ‘visit’ another of the UK’s detention centres and we hear from people who have been detained there (and who still are), volunteer visitors to that centre, NGOs and campaigners who are involved with challenging immigration detention, and the families, friends, neighbours and communities over whom detention casts its long shadows.  The tour runs from 10 October to 18 December 2016. Continue reading “Unlocking Detention 2016: be part of shining a spotlight in the shadows”

APPG on social integration inquiry

parliament_logoThe All Party Parliamentary Group for Social Integration has launched an inquiry into how reform of the immigration system can put migrant integration at its heart. Written evidence must be submitted by 9 September (maximum of 2,500 words). For full details see: http://www.socialintegrationappg.org.uk/call-for-evidence-100816

If you have any anecdotes that tell the stories of those affected please would you send them for now to Bridget Walker b467@btinternet.com

If you would have time to collate responses we would be very appreciative.

John Featonby: he suggests that submissions could be made about people who need to apply for Leave to Remain, and those who have to pay  a lot of money to do so. He is not sure how much focus the inquiry panel would give the issue – that’s out of his hands – but it would be something worth raising .