Yarl’s Wood women on hunger strike ‘locked up and denied treatment’

As their protest runs into a fourth day, some are said to be fainting or injured. But the Home Office denies wrongdoing

A controversial immigration removal centre was reported to be in a state of chaos today, as at least 50 women entered the fourth day of a hunger strike, with several fainting in corridors and almost 20 locked outdoors wearing few clothes.

Yarl’s Wood detention centre in Bedfordshire, which houses 405 women and children, was in lockdown, leaving women in communal spaces without food, water or toilet facilities.

Several women who tried to escape through a window were then locked outside, according to one detainee, including one whose finger was almost severed as she escaped but who had not received medical treatment. Continue reading “Yarl’s Wood women on hunger strike ‘locked up and denied treatment’”

Detention should be used only if less intrusive measures have been tried and found insufficient.

Asylum seekers should not be detained solely on the basis of lodging a claim for asylum, nor for their illegal entry or presence in the country where they lodge a claim for asylum

Detention should be used only if less intrusive measures have been tried and found insufficient.

New Council of Europe resolution on the detention of migrants in Europe
1 February 2010 — The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) adopted a resolution on the detention of asylum seekers and irregular migrants in Europe.  The resolution, adopted on 28 January, states in no unclear terms that detention results from political decisions that represent a “hardening attitude towards irregular migrants and asylum seekers”. Continue reading “Detention should be used only if less intrusive measures have been tried and found insufficient.”

Border staff humiliate and trick asylum seekers ? whistleblower

Louise Perrett says she was advised at the Border Agency office in Cardiff to refuse difficult asylum claims

Diane Taylor and Hugh Muir
Wednesday February 3 2010
The Guardian

http://www.guardian .co.uk/uk/ 2010/feb/ 02/border- staff-asylum- seekers-whistleb lower

Claims that asylum seekers are mistreated, tricked and humiliated by staff working for the UK Border Agency are to be investigated in parliament.

The home affairs select committee chairman, Keith Vaz, has called for an investigation following allegations that officials at one of the government’s major centres for processing asylum seekers’ claims express fiercely anti-immigration views and take  pride in refusing applications. Continue reading “Border staff humiliate and trick asylum seekers ? whistleblower”

THE DETENTION OF CHILDREN A statement from the Rt Revd John Packer, Bishop of Ripon and Leeds, Chair of the Urban Bishops Panel.

On 2nd February the Church celebrates the value and potential of a child’s life as we remember the Presentation of Christ in the Temple.

In the UK the value and potential of many children is denied through the continued practice of detaining children in immigration detention centres. Each year over 2000 children are detained in prison-like conditions. No limit is set to the time in which children may be detained.

As Bishop of Ripon and Leeds I am aware of the impact of removal and detention on those who experience it as well as those left behind, in our schools, communities and congregations. I welcome the initiative of the End Child Detention Now Campaign.

Children are detained through no fault of their own. They are often removed from familiar settings in sudden and alarming circumstances leaving behind friends, toys and personal possessions. Detention is a distressing experience. Child detainees experience insomnia, bed wetting, weight loss, speech regression, depression, and are known to self-harm. The children of asylum seekers are a vulnerable group, made more so by this policy which has no regard for their mental health. The experience of detention often evokes the trauma they have experience when flees their country of origin. Continue reading “THE DETENTION OF CHILDREN A statement from the Rt Revd John Packer, Bishop of Ripon and Leeds, Chair of the Urban Bishops Panel.”

Asylum: Mothers’ & Children’s Right to Family Reunion, online petition

To: UK Government

• Many people seeking asylum in the UK are mothers fleeing war, persecution, rape and other torture.

• To protect themselves and their children, mothers are often forced to leave their children behind –usually they don’t know where they are going or how they will survive.

• Mothers may lose contact with children back home or hear of them unprotected and suffering, and can do little to prevent it.

• It can take many years for an asylum claim to be settled; meanwhile: children suffer the torture of being deprived of their mother’s love and care, left destitute, at risk of sexual and other violence; mothers are treated as single people and the pain of separation and of trying to be a carer long distance is invisible and unrecognised.

• When mothers win the right to stay, most are not automatically granted the right of family reunion. If children turn 18 while their mother’s application is being considered they lose the right to join their mother.

* We are a mothers’ campaign, so we speak particularly of mothers, the primary carers in every society, but we know that the problems and heartbreak we describe are often true of fathers, grandparents & other carers. Continue reading “Asylum: Mothers’ & Children’s Right to Family Reunion, online petition”

BA (Nigeria) (FC); (2) PE (Cameroon) (FC) – THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED KINGDOM

THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED KINGDOM

[2009] UKSC 7
On appeal from: [2009] EWCA Civ 119

Date heard: 30/07/2009
Judgment given on: 26/11/2009

Before:
Lord Hope, Deputy President
Lord Scott
Lord Rodger; Lady Hale; Lord Brown

The Secretary of State for the Home Department
Appellant

(1) BA (Nigeria) (FC); (2) PE (Cameroon) (FC)
Respondents

JUDGMENT

On appeal from: [2009] EWCA Civ 119 Continue reading “BA (Nigeria) (FC); (2) PE (Cameroon) (FC) – THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED KINGDOM”

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Over the coming months we will be working with other organisations and individuals who share our view that the detention of children must end. We will be pressing the government to change its policy so that children are no longer locked up in detention centres.

Join the campaign…

If, like us, you think detaining children is unacceptable please add your voice to the campaign.

We will keep you updated with campaign news and ideas of how you can take action to give some of the most vulnerable children in the UK their childhood back.

Children in detention: ‘it is like a prison’

Both The Children’s Society and Bail for Immigration Detainees work directly with children and families in immigration detention, providing much-needed legal and welfare support. As a result, we have heard first hand the appalling effects of detention on children. Below is just a small selection of quotes from those who have experienced detention. As the OutCry! campaign progresses, we will be working hard to put the voices of children and families at the front and centre of our efforts to persuade the Government to end this shameful practice.

“I am Sophie, I am 7 years old. I go to school at St Mark’s School. I like my school and my teacher and all my friends. I miss them a lot. I miss my house. I don’t like this place where I am so afraid. I don’t want to stay here. I don’t want to go to prison. I am afraid of this people with white shirt they are not nice. I want to return in my house.”

(7 year old) Continue reading “Children in detention: ‘it is like a prison’”

OutCry! campaign update – help us to end the immigration detention of children

We hope that 2010 is treating you well so far. There’s lots to tell you about the OutCry! campaign and the momentum that is now building to end the immigration detention of children. And so much of this momentum is down to all of you who have helped take action on this issue, whether by sending a Christmas card to the Immigration Minister, spreading the word about OutCry!, signing petitions, contacting your MPs, gaining media coverage of the issue in your local area – the list goes on! So a huge thank you and well done to every individual, organisation or campaigning group who has raised the issue. Read on to find out what you can do next to help the campaign, especially using our easy online tool to email your local newspaper editor. Continue reading “OutCry! campaign update – help us to end the immigration detention of children”